Anonymous asked: "Hey there, I'm looking for people with a similar experience to me: I have a form of rapid cycling bipolar NOS, and it comes with 'attacks' when I get very depressed - almost like a seizure, as my body collapses and goes into tremors, my brain doesn't function, I get a cold sweat and intense terror for up to half an hour. I've been unable to understand or explain this and find little online, and wondered if anyone had a similar experience."

This is very, very unusual. I would strongly urge you to think of seeing a neurologist - I don’t want to frighten you, but there are many physical brain abnormalities that can cause mood swings, and coupled with your physical symptoms, it makes me very worried for you. The sweating and tremors could also be the result of severe anxiety, but either way, it’s something the needs to be immediately addressed by a doctor.

If any of our readers have experience with these types of symptoms, we would really appreciate it if you would share your stories. 

Good luck,
Tracie 




lalondes:

REALLY, REALLY IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
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lalondes:

REALLY, REALLY IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT

i’m assuming that you’re all familiar with tumblr saviour at this point - i use tumblr saviour every day for blocking nsfw content while i’m at work, not to mention wiping my dash of blood, gore, and theamazingatheist. tumblr saviour is invaluable, honestly. we all know that. and we’ve all wished that we could just tumblr saviour the entire internet, right?

well, hold on to your hats, because this app, silencer, is functionally tumblr saviour for the entire internet.

this is a goddamned godsend. i’ve tried it out with a few annoying and triggering terms, and it works like a fucking charm. spoilery tweets about what happened on last sunday’s breaking bad? gone. incessant royal baby facebook posts? evaporated. i literally cannot express to you how happy this app makes me and how helpful it has been.

it also comes with custom “mute packs” - sets of buzzwords about popular events or spoiler-prone tv shows that you can just automatically mute, and voila, your twitter and facebook feeds are clean.

i wouldn’t be making this post unless i was dead fucking serious about making sure that you all have this in your lives. download it here.




what-a-nice-blog:

CAN I JUST SAY TO ANYONE SUFFERING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS YOU ARE ONE BADASS MOTHER FRICKER BECAUSE NOTHING IS MORE TERRIFYING THAN BATTLING WITH YOUR OWN MIND EVERY SINGLE DAY




 Anonymous asked: "I'm scared b/c my psychiatrist says I have symptoms of bipolar disorder, but don't meet the length criteria for episodes. So, she's giving me prozac to help with my mood swings, and if my "high" moods become more frequent/longer or I get more violent, then I have bipolar. I'm really afraid. I want to get better but I don't even know what a diagnosis of bipolar will mean."

I understand being afraid of the future. A lot of people don’t know what to expect when they get a diagnosis of bipolar, and rightfully so - the disease is often unpredictable, but often, only when it is not managed well. 

Instead of fearing a diagnosis, look at the positives of getting the right one. You’ll be able to get the help you need, find specialists in the area, get the medication you need to control your symptoms, and it will be easier to deal with insurance. If you don’t have insurance, having a diagnosis will open up more community resources for you to get care for little or no cost. You’ll be able to work with your doctor to provide you with the best quality of life - and not just an “okay” or “pretty decent” quality of life. Once you’re stable, you will have just as good a life as someone without bipolar disorder. You’ll just have a few challenges that people without the illness do not face.

Nobody is better off having an undiagnosed mental illness. At best, it is painful, lonely, and frightening. At worst, it’s deadly. A diagnosis means everything to those dealing with severe mental illnesses, and it is nothing to be afraid of or worried about. You don’t start dealing with a mental illness when you get a diagnosis - you start dealing with it when you first start showing symptoms, even if you don’t know what you’re dealing with. 

It takes a lot of courage to face the future of a life with mental illness. But if you’re still here today, still hopeful about what you can do with your life, then you are among the bravest people out there. You can do this, whether you have depression, bipolar, or something entirely different. As cliche as it sounds - everything is going to be okay.

Good luck,
Tracie

· posted 2 weeks ago · 16 notes ·
tagged as: #ask #fybo advice



 Anonymous asked: "I'm in the early stages of a relationship and I am also in the process of being diagnosed as bipolar 2. How do I tell my boyfriend about all of this? It's not that I am ashamed of it I just want to know the best way of telling him."

We get this question SO often. Eventually I want to have a subpage in the “bipolar and relationships” link talking about ways to talk to an SO about mental health. For now, I think my best answer was the one I gave here

I think the best way of telling someone is to practice what you’re going to say. I’m assuming you probably know this person pretty well and can imagine the responses or questions he might have, plan your own responses to these. 

Like I state in the linked ask, it’s such a person to person private and varying situation that it’s difficult to give an hard line answer. You have to do what feels best for you and for your situation. I could go on for years about the importance of communication in any relationship, but it’s also a personal decision for you to decide if you’re ready to share this information with him. While it’s important that your partner be comfortable with this part of you, you’ve also just started the process of being diagnosed, so to me, making sure that you’re comfortable and educated and OK with these new mental health revelations comes before making sure he is. 

The only real advice I can give that would apply to everyone is making sure this conversation takes place in person, on a day or time that your both stress free, with no distractions around or serious time constraints. 

Best wishes 

xx Dev




 Anonymous asked: "I absolutely love the new Wellness Wednesday part of the blog. I can't wait to start on my own comfort box. Thank you for all that you do :)"

image

Ahhh this makes me so happy! I’ve been wanting to do something like Wellness Wednesday for a while now, but I wasn’t sure how the community would react to FYBO posting stuff that wasn’t strictly related to bipolar disorder. However as time went by I felt more and more passionately about adding more general mental health related stuff to our posts and I’m thrilled that yesterdays post was received as well as it was. I’m excited to start acting on future ideas and improving the quality of FYBO, expanding who it can help and it what ways. 

thank you, thank you for your kind words.

xx Dev




 Anonymous asked: "I've been having a mixed episode, and have been feeling suicidal for the past three weeks and I spoke to my psych about it and she recommend an intensive outpatient program. I'm not very sure as to what to expect or if I should even do it. Do you know more about IOP?"

Trigger warning: talk of hospitalization 

IOP is going to differ at every clinic or hospital. But I will give you the run down from what I’ve experienced and what I know. 

When it comes to mental health hospitalization there are three basic levels.

There is the inpatient program (IP), where you stay at the facility 24 hours a day for anywhere from 72 hours up. You eat at the center, you shower there, you sleep there, you have different types of group therapy a bazillion times a day. It’s the most intense option, usually used for those who are currently considered a harm to themselves or others. This is the one I have the most personal experience with. 

I think I would rank IOP as the next most intense. I’ve never done IOP, I went from IP to PHP (which I’ll discuss next). But at one of the facilities I did IOP at there were a few people who came for IOP, they basically spent the bulk of their day at the center but got to go home at night for like dinner and to sleep. They usually came around nine am and would go home around seven or eight. Picture it as just really involved therapy. I think IOP is a great option for those who can’t handle or don’t quite need inpatient treatment. 

Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) is obviously just below that. I did this after an IP stay and I went to the clinic at nine in the morning and left at three. We did group therapy, an (mental health) education class, followed by craft or gym time depending on the day, lunch and then a bunch of self help work sheets to end out the day. It’s kind of like a day school but with smoke breaks and average hospital food. Again, a great option for those who can’t or are not in need of the above options. 

I will mention that depending on your area, IOP and PHP could be the same. The hours could be slightly different as could the programming. When your doctor suggests IOP what they could be thinking of could be closer to what I describe as a PHP, it’s not set in stone and you can always call local clinics to get more information on the programs they offer. Usually, the evaluation is free. 

Don’t let stigma or stereotypes of mental hospitals scare you, do your research, talk to your doctor, ask around, call around, google reviews, and do what’s best for you. And of course, you have more questions, I’ll do my best to help!

xx Dev






Welcome to Wellness Wednesday 

This week’s topic is Comfort Boxes

-What is a comfort box

A comfort box is a very easy form of at home therapy / self care that is pretty basic to put together. All you need is a box (or bag) and somethings that you love. The idea is that you have this wonderful things that make you happy gathered in one place and when you need it, it’s all right there for you. 

-What do I put in a comfort box

Anything that has a positive influence on the way you think! Ideas include, but are no means limited to,:

crayons and some coloring pages

a positive book, poem, comic, etc. 

your favorite smell good items

a journal

a favorite CD

a sweet letter from a loved one or from yourself to yourself

things that remind you of your positive accomplishments 

-Why is a comfort box is a good idea for mental health wellness

Having an easy to reach group of items that make you happy is always a good idea. If you’re like me, you might get frustrated pretty easily and frustration might set in faster if you’re already experiencing an intense mood such as anxiety or depression, if I need one of these things that I know will help calm me down and for whatever reason I can’t find it, it’s only going to make the situation worse, having them in a safe place makes getting to my “happy place” that much easier. 

When you’re experiencing an intense mood and you need to calm yourself, a distraction is the best place to start, for some of us, we turn to negative distractions, usually because they are the first to come to mind and easiest to access. Having a comfort box changes this, now your easiest distraction is full of positive options. 

-What’s in your comfort box

My comfort box itself just makes me happy because I love Marvel and I was so happy to find this empty Marvel shoe box. Inside the box are:

An 11th Doctor Hello Kitty that my Aunt made for me Christmas before Last. 

A pack of Crayons 

A rustic looking set of playing cards that I use to play solitaire or just shuffle and organize over again as a quick distraction. 

"Bali Sunrise" soy candle from Target 

Sinful Colors nail polish in “Midnight Blue” (when it’s on it’s TARDIS blue) 

Solana Beach body cream from Hollister 

And last but not least, the paper version of my license. Having my drivers license and being able to comfortably drive a car by myself is something I never thought I would achieve. Some of my worst anxiety driven fears involve cars. I was 21 before I had my license and it took three tries, but I keep that paper as a reminder that I am stronger than I know and my fears can be conquered. 

Hopefully this post on comfort boxes encourages you to put together one of your own. 

xx Dev